Alex Sosa Flockjay Tech Fellow Spotlight

Alex Sosa Flockjay Tech Fellow Spotlight

Our diverse community of students comes together from various non-traditional backgrounds to learn, reskill, and unite around a shared goal to break into tech sales as an SDR.

As Flockjay charts our path forward in the workplace, it is with the utmost pride that we share the stories of our Tech Fellows, both current and alumni. We think it’s important for our mission-aligned hiring partners seeking to strengthen and diversify their sales teams to learn more about where our elite students come from. They are ready to make an undeniably positive impact.

Meet Alexander Sosa, a Flockjay Tech Fellow from our eighth class and current SDR for hire. He shared a few details about his journey with us below. His sales trainers had this to share:

“Alex shows constant support, empathy, and leadership. When not in class, you can find him on Slack helping others. He has the unique ability to show people how to problem solve without telling them exactly how to do something resulting in his teammates learning. His willingness to look outside of himself and make those around him better is one of the most valuable contributions Alex has made in our program.”

What did life look like before you found Flockjay?

Life before Flockjay was a challenge; in my local area, the main opportunities to get into a tech were only coding boot camps or programs for other highly technical positions, areas that didn’t fit my exact interests of tech and business combined.

At my previous employer, I was trying to get into sales, but over half the sales staff was laid off during my time there. I went back to the drawing board to try and find ways to get into the tech industry/sales field and found Flockjay through a tech website I frequented.

After applying, I was afforded the opportunity (by qualifying in the top 7% of applicants) to be accepted into the program. Flockjay has helped me master my sales skills and add more valuable experience for a future employer. 

I have experience in sales and customer service that have taken me far, but I have more goals I am determined to accomplish. Hard work is something that is instilled in me and it’s a work ethic I take with me everywhere I am and in everything I do, even outside of work.

I like to prove myself by mastering job responsibilities in every environment. Then, improving anything I can in my work surroundings to bring more value and efficiency to a team.

What past accomplishments are you proud of? 

My Flockjay experience has allowed me to accomplish goals in various areas that are important to me. 

Those areas are:

Being a top performer: My efforts are reflective in the results of the program’s metrics

Making genuine relationships: Creating connections with teammates through group work and assistance

Finding a need and solving for it: Whether doing discovery to qualify or disqualify future tech fellow recruits or meeting the needs of a teammate, I pride myself in finding a solution to a problem

Flockjay has allowed me to stay curious, but also exhibit my resourcefulness to go find answers, be independent, but also collaborate with my team.

Nobody can be successful on their own, it takes a team of people who are all focused on similar goals and who want the best for each other. Flockjay provided that environment. We walk together, we flock together.

Most importantly, I couldn’t have any success without that team that helped me get to this point. My trainers, TAs, and success team have all played a major part in helping me get to where I am. I appreciate the training and mentorship they’ve given me. #GRATEFUL 

What excites you most about a future SDR role?

I am most excited about exceeding sales quotas and selling a product I believe in, mastering my product knowledge, helping teammates, and giving back.

Advice for someone who wants to break into tech?

If there’s any advice I could give, I would say don’t hesitate. One asset you can’t get back is time, and the fastest moving industry is tech.

Don’t miss out on what could possibly be your future. Flockjay can literally change your life in 10 weeks, that’s how fast the EdTech industry is training now.

If you need help, know that the people at Flockjay want what’s best for you and want you to succeed.

If you’re willing to put in the work to make a change in your life, you’re in the right place.

Grab your wings. It’s your turn to fly.

Follow His Journey from Tech Fellow to Elite SDR

We encourage you to connect with Alex on LinkedIn to follow his upward journey. While you’re there, follow Flockjay for more Tech Fellow spotlights and success stories.

Are you a sales leader who is growing your team? If you’d like to connect with more quality SDRs for hire like Alex, please email partners@flockjay.com or get more info right now.

Are you seeking a career opportunity? Interested in becoming a Tech Fellow? Read our FAQ and apply for our next class – it begins February 16, 2021.

You can hear more about where Flockjay is headed from our Founder and CEO, Shaan Hatharamani, in the TechCrunch blog below.

Want a job in tech? Flockjay pitches its sales training service as an on-ramp to tech careers

Partner with Flockjay to Diversify & Strengthen Your Team

Flockjay reps already love to sell. They are trained by the best, onboard faster, perform better, and stay longer. Interested in diversifying your sales team with pre-trained talent?

Flockjay is a Glassdoor Best Place to Work in 2021

Flockjay is a Glassdoor Best Place to Work in 2021

Flockjay is pleased to announce we are among the winners of the annual Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Awards, a list of the Best Places to Work in 2021.

Unlike other awards, there is no self-nomination or application process. Instead, it’s entirely based on the feedback our employees have voluntarily and anonymously shared on Glassdoor. To determine the winners of the awards, Glassdoor evaluates all company reviews shared by employees over the past year.

This year, we are proud to be recognized as a Best Place to Work among U.S. companies with fewer than 1,000 employees. Flockjay ranks #21 out of 50 on Glassdoor’s Best Places to Work US Small and Medium companies list!

Flockjay’s Future is Bright, Thanks to Our Community

A huge thank you goes out to all our employees who took the time to share their perspective on what it’s like to work here and be a member of our growing Flockjay community. We appreciate all the valuable feedback as it only helps us improve. We are proud to be on this journey with you and endlessly grateful for your collective support of our mission and commitment to diversity and inclusionCheers to continuing to build the future of tech together!

A word from Flockjay Founder and CEO, Shaan Hatharamani:

“It’s very important to us that our team members and our community members feel valued and supported, and it’s encouraging to see signs that we’re on the right track. We’re here to build a generational company, and it starts with investing in our people.”

Below are just a few words one employee shared on Glassdoor that contributed to the award and made us feel incredibly honored:

Excellent training, awesome team, friendly atmosphere, and there’s opportunity to grow.

Follow Flockjay’s Upward Journey: Now Hiring

Flockjay is growing fast! We are so excited to continue working in support of our mission to empower upward mobility through education and access and would love to hear from anyone who wants to join us.

See Flockjay’s current job listings and apply today.

For more information about Flockjay, read our Glassdoor reviews, CourseReport reviews, Flockjay FAQ, and find us @flockjay on LinkedInTwitter, Facebook, and Instagram. 

To learn more about our students, read How Clovette Pivoted into Tech Sales with Flockjay or learn about Raven Winchester, who more than doubled her salary after reskilling with Flockjay. Read our company blog for more success stories that make our jobs so rewarding.

Email partners@flockjay.com if your team is growing and you’d like to connect with elite SDRs.

Partner with Flockjay to Diversify & Strengthen Your Team

Flockjay reps already love to sell. They are trained by the best, onboard faster, perform better, and stay longer. Interested in diversifying your sales team with pre-trained talent?

Hong Ho Flockjay Tech Fellow Spotlight

Hong Ho Flockjay Tech Fellow Spotlight

Our diverse community of students comes together from various non-traditional backgrounds to learn, reskill, and unite around a shared goal to break into tech sales as an SDR. It is with the utmost pride that we share their stories with incoming Tech Fellows, in addition to our mission-aligned hiring partners seeking to strengthen and diversify their sales teams with elite candidates.

Meet Hong Ho, a Flockjay Tech Fellow from our eighth class and current SDR for hire. Hong shared a few details about her journey to tech sales with us in this interview. Her sales trainers say:

“Hong is a true leader amongst her peers. She always leads group activities and has great work ethic and curiosity. Excellent leadership and communication!”

What did life look like before you found Flockjay?

I am a sales professional with 4 years of experience in the event industry. After college, I started work at Singularity University, where we provided networking events for top executives at fortune 500 companies and leveraged technology to disrupt their industry through custom-designed programs.

In this role, I discovered the significance of being part of a team and learned I thrive in a culture where being an asset to the team is invaluable. I wore many hats as an event coordinator and team player, including assisting the sales team by prospecting inbound leads, overcoming objections, and asking questions during the events.

From there, I knew I could be a great salesperson; I only needed a program to help polish my skills.

What past accomplishments are you proud of?

Recently, Flockjay charged us with recruiting future SDRs through social selling. I was consistently the top performer for recruiting the most prospects, qualified leads, emails, and disco calls for the “future SDRs”. I was able to exceed my own personal goals of prospecting 5 leads through social posts and scheduling 3 disco calls a day, which I am proud of.

What excites you most about a future SDR role?

I am super excited for the opportunity to resume being the top SDR by:

  • Learning the sales playbook at my future company
  • Adjusting my current script to ensure I am sending the best cold email to prospects
  • Discovering more outbound leads through social selling
  • And developing my own disco call rhythm

I know I can do that by shadowing the leading performers at my future company. And I believe that great company culture, where I will be challenged to push myself and prove that I am a top performer, will help me grow professionally.

Advice for someone who wants to break into tech?

No matter how much passion you have for entering tech, it might not be good enough if you don’t have the resilience to back it up. There will be multiple times where you are rejected, where you feel discouraged, where you are challenged. Make sure you have a concrete reason to push you to your limits. Be prepared for the hard work and dedication you will need to go past the finish line.

Her Journey from Flockjay Grad to Elite SDR

We encourage you to connect with Hong on LinkedIn to follow her upward journey. While you’re there, follow Flockjay for more Tech Fellow spotlights and success stories. Be sure to follow the hashtag #flockstarspotlight on LinkedIn for the latest stories.

Are you a leader who is growing your sales team? If you’d like to connect with more quality SDRs for hire like Audrey, please email partners@flockjay.com or get more info right now. Read about the power of reskilling in this SF Chronicle feature highlighting Flockjay alumni Raven.

Seeking a career opportunity? Read our FAQ and apply for our next class – it begins January 19, 2021! Apply ASAP to be considered.

Partner with Flockjay to Diversify & Strengthen Your Team

Flockjay reps already love to sell. They are trained by the best, onboard faster, perform better, and stay longer. Interested in diversifying your sales team with pre-trained talent?

8 Tips on Building Diversity in Tech Through Sales Roles

8 Tips on Building Diversity in Tech Through Sales Roles

“We believe diversity and equity matter everywhere, not just for ourselves but in the companies we work for, lead, and invest in.” —Shaan Hatharamani, Flockjay Founder & CEO

Sales roles have the power to catapult coachable folks into a life-changing, lasting career in tech. We know this at Flockjay because our diverse graduates have proven it to us. Traits like grit, curiosity, and a growth mindset can be some of the greatest indicators of success for sales candidates. None of those things have to do with a fancy piece of paper or pile of college debt.

Sales is an onramp with limitless potential for anyone who wants to build a career in our industry, regardless of a lack of “traditional” experience. So, why does this onramp seem so hidden? Why are there so many secret rules baked into breaking in the tech industry?

To explore questions like this and discuss effective solutions, we gathered the following tech leaders and hosted a panel discussion on Building Diversity Through Sales Roles

Each of our panelists brought incredible heart and perspectives to this energizing discussion. It’s time to rethink our approach to recruiting and referrals, reassess diversity data, and focus on attributes like coachability to get the right candidates in the door. It won’t be easy, but it’s vital to increase the accessibility of sales roles and strengthen the future of our global industry. 

As Ebony put it, “Have the courage to make suggestions, push back, have tough discussions, and really become comfortable being uncomfortable.” 

The panel made one thing clear: Driving the needle forward on building diversity is going to take all of us, and it starts today with these actionable tips.

Miss this discussion in real-time? Watch here.

1. Hiring Managers Need to Take on More Responsibility 

In the words of Kelly, Head of Sales Training at Flockjay, who excels at keeping it real:

“Hiring managers need to take on more responsibility. We are quickly coming to a time when, if you’re a hiring manager and you don’t have a pretty diverse team, that is not going to be a great look for you.” 

If your team isn’t diverse, pointing the finger at your recruiting team isn’t going to fix the problem. Dishing out blame isn’t effective. All stakeholders have to work together to build diversity that lasts and allows your business to operate more effectively. If you’re a hiring manager growing your sales team and focusing on DEI, lean into discomfort. Make it your responsibility to become and act as a partner with the recruiting team.

Frederik, Co-founder at BLCK VC, said:

“In the hiring process, you should feel uncomfortable. Because if you don’t feel uncomfortable, that means you’re falling back onto what you’ve done already, the things you’ve been anchoring to. And this has to feel different. You should have a pit in your stomach. Lean into that discomfort, that is okay. That is how we drive change.”

2. Understand That Your Customers are Increasingly Diverse 

This might feel like a no-brainer, but it’s an important takeaway. Because your customers are diverse. You’re competing in a global market. Diverse sales teams can better support a diverse customer base.

After all, sales teams are the front lines with your customers and represent the face of your company. What face do you want to show the world? What will your increasingly diverse customers see? Hire wisely when growing your sales team. In Kelly’s words: 

“The reality of it is most of us are building products for a diverse set of consumers, and so how do you expect to build and sell and do all the things necessary to be successful without inviting in all these different perspectives to the conversation?”

Our founder Shaan echoed this:

“It’s not just about providing pathways into sales organizations. It is rooting future leaders at companies, so that, when you’re making decisions with your technology that impacts millions of users, you have a different perspective in the room that actually can move the needle and create a better economic outcome.”

He added, “Sales teams are the front lines with your customers, that’s where you’re getting the feedback loop on your product and what you’re building. If you aren’t reflecting that diversity of customer base that’s growing with your sales team, then you have lost the most fundamental opportunity to improve what you’re doing as a product.”

3. Expand Beyond the Traditional Employee Referral Cycle

Take a moment to stop and think about your current sourcing process. If you operate like most companies, your sourcing process is largely made up of employee referrals. And, when it comes to who our employees refer, it’s largely people from their network – which tends to be largely homogenous. Put simply, employee referrals disproportionately benefit white men.

Jacob, Founding Member at LatinxVC and Partner at Shasta Ventures, mentioned that while familiar tech recruiting processes can be effective, they’re “absolutely a double-edged sword.” Why? Because, well, you’ll get more of the same.

Jacob said, “As companies grow past the founding group, we need to be opening up networks drastically, and part of that is structure.”

Unsure where to begin? You’re not alone. We all have to start somewhere. At Flockjay, we don’t want our referral program to be the enemy of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Because of this, we openly share this important data to consider with all referring employees prior to submitting:

  • Referral programs disproportionately benefited white men ⮕ white women were 12% less likely to receive a referral, men of color were 26% less likely and women of color were 35% less likely
  • Referrals from a close friend/family member were most common, but had lowest level of engagement outcomes
  • Targeted referrals (such as cold messaging someone at target company) were least common, but had highest level of engagement outcomes

At Flockjay, as we look to grow our team, we know that our networks are an important source of referrals. But we also know we need to look beyond our networks. And, the data shows that when we do, we see high levels of engagement with these candidates.

Jacob added a proactive example of expanding beyond your traditional network: discouraging warm intros. In his own experience he has found that “When everyone fills out the same standardized information and it’s sent and filtered through recruiters who are external to the first round, they can bring together the best candidates for that role from a larger pool.” 

For recruiters and hiring managers looking to balance out the employee referral cycle, restructure incentives to minimize systemic bias. Consider throwing out traditional network-based hiring processes and replacing them with employee referral programs that lead to a diverse slate of candidates. Encourage your employees to engage with your job postings and share them with underserved groups and networks.

Want to diversify your sales talent pool with elite SDRs? Hire with Flockjay

Fun Fact: When an employee referral joins our team at Flockjay and hits their 90-day anniversary, the first reward the referring employee receives is a $250 donation Flockjay will make in their name to a non-profit organization of their choice. To me, that carries more impact, because it reinforces company alignment to our mission and speaks to our greater purpose.

4. Drop Secret Barriers to Entry with Increased Transparency 

As the old adage goes, “Secrets, secrets, are no fun, secrets, secrets, hurt someone!” And in this case, the “secret rules” that have long been implied in tech hiring are actually hurting your company, in addition to the candidates you’re leaving out.

Kelly, our Head of Sales Training, brought up a couple common “secret rules,” like only considering candidates with 1-page resumes and active LinkedIn profiles. Many companies employ these secret rules without really questioning why, but Kelly urges you to start assessing your own barriers for hires today.

As we move forward, the onus to break these barriers down does not fall on one team, it requires collective acknowledgment. It is the companies’ responsibility to demystify the process and make sales more accessible, and it starts with removing barriers to entry for candidates.

5. Align Attributes with Sales Success (a College Degree Doesn’t = Grit)

Piggybacking off the last tip, one of the most critical barriers that need to be reassessed is requiring a college degree for an entry-level sales role. In reality, a fancy degree doesn’t actually tell you much about a person’s ability to find success in a sales role, but it does tell you they had access to opportunities.

So really think about it, hiring managers: What skills are you looking for that you’re using a 4-year degree as a proxy for? Reevaluate requirements to focus on attributes. 

Sales is teachable, and traditionally diverse candidates do well in sales because they possess several of the inherent skills and attributes that align with that success. Hire based on traits we know are predictors for being a top sales rep: grit, hustle, strong communication, tenacity, emotional intelligence (EQ), perseverance, curiosity, optimism, gratitude, and self-control.

Jacob nodded to the importance of grit and brought up an excellent point about some of the best CROs he knows being immigrants. He said:

“They [immigrants] have found tremendous success in leveraging the multi-faceted skillset that it takes to be an outsider in the United States in order to build social connections, networks, and be able to exert influence to an outcome. And it’s a tremendously difficult, high EQ skill that I think a lot of people don’t even notice for people that aren’t from the U.S., or look different than what we think a person from the U.S. looks like.”

The most impactful thing you can do is hire diverse coachable individuals with a growth mindset. There are so many diverse candidates who have the potential to excel in sales roles but don’t even realize it yet due to misconceptions about the profession. None of this can happen without aligning stakeholders on hiring from the top down. It’s our job to push management teams to lean in more aggressively and understand it will take all of us to effect changes.

Ebony said:

“I encourage everyone to take an honest inventory of all of our blind spots and be flexible enough to be willing to try new solutions. Have that courage to make suggestions, to push back, have tough discussions, and really become comfortable being uncomfortable.”

6. Build Support Systems from Within to Retain Diverse Sales Hires 

Building lasting diversity in tech doesn’t stop with the hiring process. If you’re looking around the room at a sales team with a diversity of talents, backgrounds, and ethnicities, that’s one piece of the puzzle. But if you want those people to stay with your company and reduce common turnover, building support systems from within to nurture lasting inclusion is essential. Sales is a highly consultative role focused on supporting and guiding customers. And without support, sales can be a lonely place. Ebony said:

“Sales is like a game of tag, even though you’re on a team of people who are supposed to be friendly, it’s still a competition. And this can make people feel even more lonely sometimes in their roles.”

So how can we start improving the support we provide today? Kelly said:

“People think it’s so much more complex than it is, but check on your team. A ‘hey how are you doing? or’ I know you’re part of this community that was really affected by police brutality, are you ok?’ or ‘Can I support you right now?’ goes a long way. Asking questions, being human, getting more resources behind them, and connecting folks with mentors on your team are all places where you can start.”

She added, “A big part of the reason we started Flockjay is we know that diverse candidates need support to be successful in tech in the long term. If you try to go at it alone, you will not be successful. I know from my own experience.” 

Ebony, CEO at Salesforce Foundation and Chief Philanthropy Officer at Salesforce, said:

“We have to start programs and support organizations within our own companies that will give people the access to social capital, give them the skills, give them the networks and experiences. If you’re not able to do that within your company, companies like Flockjay that have programs where people can go and get those networks are so vitally important.”

At Flockjay, we have built support systems from within in a few different ways. Our students begin fostering a sense of community from day one. Our Alumni Network focuses on providing additional support to Tech Fellows going through the stressful and exciting hiring process.

We have established various Flockjay Identity Groups (FIGs) with internal leaders and students that serve as a place for different groups to connect. And, we check in our team (their whole selves).

6. Evaluate Diversity Data as You Would a NPS Score 

Transparency around where you are now and where you’re going matters. Ebony said, “I wish there was a way to have a metric on bulk inclusion – like a Net Promoter Score, for example – that your team could rate you on anonymously so that we as executives in our companies could really assess who is doing well with this, not just for the team that looks the most diverse, but is also feeling included.”

A Net Promoter Score (NPS) is a tool that, “measures customer experience and predicts business growth. This proven metric transformed the business world and now provides the core measurement for customer experience management programs.”

It is a simple way to get a pulse on how your business is doing, which is why NPS is so widely accepted as a metric in our industry. We’re at a point where it’s time to start evaluating your diversity data in a similar, routined way. Normalize collecting, analyzing, and sharing your diversity data in a fully transparent way. Analyze your attrition/promotion rates. 

Kelly said:

“Did all of the ‘diverse’ people on your team leave after 6 months? Were you able to actually hire, retain, support, and promote diverse candidates? That would be something that’s interesting to know.”

Look for opportunities to improve DEI within your findings. Then, improve. Don’t shy away from the findings that reveal you have more work to do. Ebony said, “Companies always talk about where they’re succeeding, rarely do you hear companies be really transparent about where they failed. I think it’s important and it’s something we’ve started implementing in our reviews.”

When Ebony sends notes around to her executive leadership team, she says she includes a win in addition to some opportunities for improvement. She wants her team to share the lessons they’ve learned and evaluate the aha moments they’ve had. She said, “If we start opening ourselves up publicly around this, it’ll be okay for companies to struggle, but they can get ideas for how to move forward.” 

Ebony said:

“Companies need to know that, not only are your current and future employees going to demand it [diversity], but it also is going to show up in your customer base. Customers are going to be looking at you, at your leadership board, your executive leadership team, at your data and numbers around diversity, and they’re going to make a business decision whether they want to be working with you or not.”

8. Consider Top Level Sponsorship vs Mentorship

Mentorship is an incredible tool, but Frederik says that layering on mentors to help new sales hires tactically understand how to be successful in the role can only go so far. Enter: sponsors.

Frederik said:

“Sales is this front door into an organization and it’s not just a pathway up a sales ladder. I think if we can really move toward getting more senior managers to be sponsors to those folks that are coming into the organization, that’ll help.”

Sponsorship extends beyond mentorship by acknowledging that entry-level sales hires are at the beginning of a journey, and being transparent with those people right away about all of the pathways they could go within the organization.

Sponsors are true advocates who want to make opportunities clear beyond being promoted from an SDR to an AE. They can do so much to provide a mirror for new hires that lets them see what opportunities around the corner look like.

Shaan said that “From my experience in running Flockjay, the most successful sales orgs are the ones where there is a high level of sponsorship for investing in support and the continuous reskilling and upskilling of your sales team.”

Partner with Flockjay to Start Building Diversity through Sales Roles

If you missed the panel in real-time, you can watch the recording on-demand here for more tips. This work matters. At Flockjay, we’re passionate about helping people from historically excluded backgrounds break into tech sales, where they can seize opportunities to grow professionally and personally. We’re also passionate about shaking up the tech industry, for the better.

frederik groce on diversity flockjay webinar quote

As Frederik put it, “Diversity isn’t just about doing the right thing because it feels good, it’s about building organizations that can perform and operate more effectively.”

Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments, and email partners@flockjay.com if your sales team is growing and you would like to connect with elite SDRs.

Partner with Flockjay to Diversify & Strengthen Your Team

Flockjay reps already love to sell. They are trained by the best, onboard faster, perform better, and stay longer. Interested in diversifying your sales team with pre-trained talent?

Growing Your Sales Team? Meet SDR for Hire Audrey Young

Growing Your Sales Team? Meet SDR for Hire Audrey Young

Our diverse community of students comes together from various non-traditional backgrounds to learn, reskill, and unite around a shared goal to break into tech sales as an SDR. It is with the utmost pride that we share their stories with incoming Tech Fellows, in addition to our mission-aligned hiring partners seeking to strengthen and diversify their sales teams with elite candidates. 

Meet Audrey Young, a Flockjay Tech Fellow from our seventh class and current SDR for hire. Audrey hails from a hospitality background and shared a few details about her journey to tech sales with us in this interview. Her sales trainers say:

“As a salesperson, Audrey takes a genuine and in-depth approach to her customers’ needs. Audrey uses her extensive product knowledge to become a trusted advisor quickly. She is goal-oriented, coachable, and excited to take on new challenges!”

What did life look like before you found Flockjay?

I was a restaurant manager who was studying human development and family relations, hoping to land a job that made a social impact. I was homeless during covid and had no idea how to get back on my feet after the restaurant industry crashed.

I couldn’t afford to go back to university so I enrolled in Flockjay because it was the ONLY chance I had of having a future career or even money at all. It changed my life. The people I met, the information I learned, and the introduction to an industry that will provide me with an opportunity to provide for myself and my family. 

What past accomplishments are you proud of? 

I’m most proud of graduating from culinary school and becoming a restaurant manager. It took a lot of grit and perseverance to get there. A lot of people told me I was too young or too “emotional” to become a manager, but I refused to accept that. I used my emotional intelligence to be a natural leader and cared enough to lead with my heart as well as my head. I was so proud to manage the team that I did. As I pursue sales, I hope to one day find myself in management again so I can give opportunities to folks who may not have otherwise had them.

What excites you most about a future SDR role?

I’m so excited to connect with other businesses and offer them solutions to problems they’re experiencing. I’m excited to make someone’s day just a little bit brighter, even if they don’t buy my product. Making those connections is what will make me successful and I’m sure of it.

Throughout our program and beyond, Audrey has shown incredible initiative and authenticity on social platforms such as LinkedIn. It has been a pleassure to witness her growth and ability to inspire those around her. Read Audrey’s post about the impact of our program, and her takeaway below from our fireside chat with Devon Jackson, AE at LaunchDarkly.

 

audrey young linkedin flockjay tech fellow

Advice for someone who wants to break into tech?

My advice is to own everything you do without shame. If you’re working to better yourself, own it. If you’re interviewing 6 times a week, own it. If you’re unsure of something, own it and ask for help. If you’re switching careers and you aren’t sure what the future holds, OWN THAT. Ownership is the key to confidence and with confidence, you have a special armor that will protect you from the emotional damage that comes with insecurity and taking a chance.

Follow Her Journey from Tech Fellow to Elite SDR

We encourage you to connect with Audrey on LinkedIn to follow her upward journey. While you’re there, follow Flockjay for more Tech Fellow spotlights and success stories. Be sure to follow the hashtag #flockstarspotlight on LinkedIn for the latest stories.

Are you a leader who is growing your sales team? If you’d like to connect with more quality SDRs for hire like Audrey, please email partners@flockjay.com or get more info right now.

👉🏽  Seeking a career opportunity? Read our FAQ and apply for our next class – it begins January 18, 2021! Apply ASAP to be considered. 

Read about the power of reskilling in this SF Chronicle feature highlighting Flockjay alumni Raven

Partner with Flockjay to Diversify & Strengthen Your Team

Flockjay reps already love to sell. They are trained by the best, onboard faster, perform better, and stay longer. Interested in diversifying your sales team with pre-trained talent?